Upper Peninsula of Michigan Pt. 2

Did you ever wonder what something really looked like up close? Or, you have ever tried to imagine what the environment is like for a very small individual? If so, then macro photography is right up your alley. Recently, I attended a workshop in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to work on macro techniques and skills. Of course, equipment is always the first topic of conversation. So as to not bore you, just a couple of points. All lenses are ground to be sharp within a certain focal distance from the camera. If you get to close too your subject, your photo will be blurry and out of focus. Macro lenses are produced to allow you to work within inches of your subject and still get tack sharp photos. Naturally you pay a premium for this speciality glass. So, many people use a telephoto lens if they have the ability to work further away from their subject or use extenders and/or extension tubes to be closer to their work. Either way, it is pretty cool to get eyeball to eyeball with things so small they are hard to detect in a meadow of wild flowers.

Fritillary butterfly sitting on a coneflower.

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A bee frozen in place by the cool early morning dew.

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Tiny dew drops adorn the antennae of this beautifully colored grasshopper while the rising sun gently backlights its form.

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Pearls of dew are strung by this spider’s web.

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The morning sun highlights the translucent nature of this spider’s legs.

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A beetle waiting for the sun to release it from the paralyzing overnight temperature.

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The pesky Robber Fly waiting to find someone to bite.

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I said intriguing not necessarily beautiful.

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Meanwhile the dragonflies wait to flit from flower to flower.

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The back of this Sphinx Moth caterpillar serves as a dinner table for the white larvae of a wasp…

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while some of these wild blueberries look like they are about ready to be eaten…

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and the scent of these petite bells enjoyed.

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We will end this with a shot of a different variety of the Fritillary butterfly. Do you know how I know this? The first one at the beginning of this post had grey eyes and this guy has brown. Now see if you can do that with the naked eye?

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Oh, one last thing. You better pay close attention to the unique driveway markers if you are looking for one of the few specific people who actually live in this vast area !!

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One response

  1. Rubn Eduardo

    Dear Steve,

    They are beautiful! Somehow they reminded me of philosophical essays concerning life and human existence. We perceive reality according to our senses.

    Few quotes from Jose Ortega y Gasset: ” I am I, plus my circumstances” this quote came to mind when seeing the eyes and environment of these tiny beings.

    Other interesting quotes from this Spanish Philosopher born in 1883. “Living is a constant process of deciding what we are going to do” “Excellence means when a man or woman ask of himself more than others do”

    Awesome pictures, thank you for sharing! Ruben

    On Sat, Feb 8, 2014 at 10:12 AM, Steve Upton Photography wrote:

    > steveuptonphotography posted: “Did you ever wonder what something > really looked like up close? Or, you have ever tried to imagine what the > environment is like for a very small individual? If so, then macro > photography is right up your alley. Recently, I attended a workshop in the > Upper”

    February 11, 2014 at 3:42 pm

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